?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Marsha Skrypuch — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Marsha Skrypuch

[ website | Marsha Skrypuch ]
[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

Links
[Links:| Authors' Booking Service Marsha's website Books and Writers Community ]

lovely letter [Jun. 9th, 2011|11:40 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
Hello Marsha,

My name is T, and I would like to tell you this wonderful story.

My mother had given a copy of your book, Nobody's Child, to my teenage children about a year ago. Being an Armenian, and having read many books based on the Armenian Genocide, I was curious about the information contained in this little book. As I read it over the past summer, I fell in love with it and immediately got and read Daughter of War. I was amazed at finding all the delicate, small but important details in those two books, things that I had not seen in the many books I had come across before.

In our school district for 10th grade English class the children have to choose a book from a list of books, representing conflicts in the history of different nations, and write a research paper on that subject as well as present it to the rest of the class.

Last year, with my daughter being in that class, she wished to do her paper and presentation about the Armenian Genocide.
Since she had not yet read any books on this subject, and there were no books about this in the class list, I suggested Nobody's Child and the teacher approved. She did an excellent job with both the paper and the power point presentation, scoring a perfect grade plus extra credits. We were thrilled with this; but there was more to come.

The teacher had liked the book and added it to the list. This meant that as of January 2011, for years to come, every 10th grader in our district will be told the true facts of the Armenian Genocide, based on your book.

Thank you for a beautiful book.

T
linkpost comment

(no subject) [Jun. 5th, 2011|01:45 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
linkpost comment

Gail Winskill launches Pajama Press [May. 30th, 2011|06:49 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
Yay! It is finally out in the public!

Check it out.

I am pleased to have a book on this stellar list.

linkpost comment

Making Bombs For Hitler [May. 5th, 2011|03:46 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
From today's Quill & Quire:

Scholastic Canada director of publishing Diane Kerner has acquired North American rights to Marsha Skrypuch’s middle-grade novel Making Bombs for Hitler, about child labourers in Germany during the Second World War. Dean Cooke of The Cooke Agency arranged the deal.

linkpost comment

Stolen Child wins Crystal Kite Award!!! [May. 3rd, 2011|02:53 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
I am thrilled that Stolen Child has won the SCBWI Crystal Kite Award for the Americas -- Canada, Mexico, Central & South America. What makes it especially wonderful is that this is a peer award.

The press release can be found here.

Congratulations to all of the winners!




linkpost comment

Book giveaway! [Apr. 4th, 2011|04:49 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
Hey everyone,

Drop by Deb Marshall's MG & YA blog here. She has just done an interview with me and is giving away copies of Stolen Child!
link5 comments|post comment

nasty snail-mail [Mar. 10th, 2011|09:00 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch


I guess I should chalk this up to things being better. It's not hate mail. No death threat. Just someone telling me that no one is interested in reading about WWII and Ukraine. The handwritten letter -- unsigned of course --  was snail-mailed to my husband's office, addressed to me.  It was postmarked right after Stolen Child was shortlisted for Children's Book of the Year.

Here it is, errors intact:

Dear Marsha Skrypuch

Many Actors and others are into writing short children's books (some don't have children)
Others -- to fill in their empty hours are into the arts (Not for financial gain)

Your stories are emotional. Sad - and suffering = Related to you by older people, friends and close relatives and you are a good listener =
The War, Ukraine, Nazis (not Germans but NAZIS) - Today people do not know these history. War. Ukraine. Words.
Many other countries have suffered more even in to-days world=
Forget about The Nazis - Hitler=
let it go = What child or adult wants to read about Hitler? = Maybe only you and your Ukraine old friends - have you been there? I've been there =



link7 comments|post comment

Tip Tuesday: Historical Fiction First Drafts [Feb. 8th, 2011|01:02 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
My good friend and fellow writer Linda Gerber is featuring writing tips each Tuesday. Check out on her awesome blog here.




This week, it is my turn as her guest tipper. It's on her blog, but also down below:


Just last week I finished the companion novel to my 2010 juvenile historical, Stolen Child. It is called Making Bombs For Hitler and is scheduled to be published by Scholastic in 2012. Writing it took four intense months.

Steps:

Do preliminary research of the era you want to write about and try to imagine yourself living in that time. Non-fiction children's books are a great preliminary research tool. Also encyclopedias and textbooks. At this stage you just want to gather enough background to get the general lay of the land.

In order to come up with a premise for a novel, ask yourself: What would happen if...

Think in terms of a dilemma for a person in your historical era.

As an example, for my 2008 Armenian genocide novel Daughter of War, the question was: If you were pregnant by rape but survived a genocide, would you want your fiance to find you?

If you can't boil your novel idea down into a question like that, it's too unwieldy a concept.

Do an outline. I hate outlines, but it is amazing what you can pre-organize by doing a one or two page point form plotting of your entire novel.

Try writing a sample chapter or two. This will help you narrow down the point of view, as well as voice and tone.

After you've done the outline and initial chapters, do more research.

Do read memoirs, diaries, newspaper articles, recordings, interviews, maps, city directories of your era. Look at photographs. If people are still alive, talk to them.

Do not read novels set during your era. If you do that, you may unconsciously pick up inaccurate bits, or you could unwittingly copy the author's style or turns of phrase.

Try to get opposing points of view of the same situation. As an example, when I was researching Daughter of War, I consulted both Armenian and Turkish memoirs, as well as those of missionaries and medical personnel of the time. Inter-library loan and abebooks.com are great resources for this sort of item.

Over-researching is great procrastination technique. Not only do you waste time, but you'll also be tempted to use everything you learn, which makes for a very boring novel.

I like to do commando research -- ie -- only as much as I'll need for the next 20 pages or so. When I dry out, I do more.

Now start writing!

Think in terms of scenes. You don't have to write the story in order. I like to start with the scene that is most vivid in my imagination. As I write each scene, I decide whether it comes before or after that first one. As the writing continues, the story develops like raindrops forming a puddle. Don't worry about sticking to your outline. Let your characters take you to new places.

Goal one is to get the first draft finished.

Set yourself a schedule. It might be to write one new page a day, or maybe to write just one new paragraph a day. I like to write one scene a day. Butt in chair (or feet under tread desk) and get those words out. Don't get up (or get off) til your goal is achieved.

Don't give in to excuses. The most lame one is that you're too busy to write. Writing can be done in a steno pad while waiting in line at the grocery store or watching your kids play baseball, or on the subway. My favourite writing place is at an airport.

Do not keep going back to page one in an attempt to make it perfect. That is just a procrastination technique. First drafts aren't supposed to be perfect.

Once you finish your first draft reward yourself!

It is a huge achievement to be able to write The End. Go to the movies, Eat chocolate. Drink wine.

Let that first draft cool off for a couple of days before looking at it again. Once you've given your brain a chance to clear, print your draft and read it aloud, carefully, a few pages at a time. You will be amazed at what you can catch when you speak your words and read them on paper instead of the screen.

There are many more steps to revision, but that's another post.

linkpost comment

OLA Best Bets for YA 2010 -- congrats all! [Feb. 5th, 2011|03:39 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch
BEST BETS

2010

Fiction Reading for Young Adults

The OLA’s Canadian Materials Committee prepares this annual list.

Books are selected on the basis of their literary merit as well as their appeal for young adults.  Illustrations are also considered in the case of graphic novels.



Armstrong, Kelley.  Reckoning.
Doubleday Canada
In book three of the Darkest Powers series, Chloe Saunders and her friends have finally found a safe haven with Andrew, a renegade supernatural, as opposed to the Edison Group as they are.  However, things are not necessarily all as they seem with Andrew, and Chloe, Tori, Simon, and Derek may be in the greatest danger they’ve faced yet. 

Brooks, Martha. Queen of Hearts.
Groundwood
When 15 year old Marie-Claire is diagnosed with tuberculosis, she and her two siblings are sent away to a sanatorium where they are kept away from each other and forced to room with strangers. Marie-Claire’s roommate is a rich and relentlessly cheerful girl named Signy and the story is as much about their friendship as it is about their struggles to beat this terrible disease in the days before a vaccine was developed.

Cummings, Gillian. Somewhere in Blue.
Lobster Press.
Sandy’s father is dead. She is desolated and barely functioning. Her mother, always somehow outside the charmed circle of Sandy’s close relationship with her father, appears not to be grieving.  Best friend Lennie is trying to provide comfort but has her own problems with a mother who keeps casting her net for a man but catching only creeps and losers. There is a boy who would like to help if he can just find a way to break through the ice wall of Sandy’s grief. A beautifully written story about the healing power of love and friendship.

Ellis, Deborah.  No Safe Place.
Groundwood
Three teenagers smuggle themselves into England, each of them with a reason to leave their native land. Abdul is from war-torn Baghdad. Rosalia had been sold into sexual slavery by an uncle and escaped just in time and Cheslav had been a young Russian soldier. Distrusting everyone, they are forced to rely on each other in order to survive. Ellis fashions another look at young people with lives very different than our own but with similar hopes and dreams.

Harvey, Alyxandra.  Hearts at Stake.
Walker & Company
Solange Drake is a natural born vampire, about to go through the change that will turn her from basically human, to thoroughly vampire.  Since Solange is the only born vampire who is female, and there is a prophecy about her becoming the ruler of the vampires, her change is creating huge tension in the vampire world.  With the Queen trying to kill her, and power hungry males trying to capture her heart, there is a lot going on in Solange’s world.  Luckily, Solange’s human friend Lucy, her seven brothers, and a vampire hunter named Kieran, are all on Solange’s side, and all fighting for her survival.

Jocelyn, Marthe.  Folly.
Tundra
Mary, a poor farm girl in 19th century England is sent from her home by a mean spirited stepmother and pressed into the life of a domestic servant.  Independent by nature, Mary soon finds a better offer in another household but burns her bridges with her family by doing so.

Harvey, Sarah N.  Death Benefits
Orca Book Publishers
As far as Royce ever knew his grandfather, Arthur, had just been this miserable old grouch, but when he's offered a lucrative summer job caring for the old guy, Royce discovers that Arthur's also very rich and famous.  The old man's health is slowly deteriorating and he wants to die. Arthur confides this secret to Royce in the hope of getting some help.

Oppel, Kenneth. Half Brother. Harper Collins
Ben Tomlin's dad has one of the more interesting jobs on the planet.  He's trying to teach sign language to a baby chimpanzee.  Having a chimp in the family certainly has its perks. Ben finds he's suddenly a chick magnet.  But he also sees some of the darker side of animal research.

Prinz, Yvonne.  The Vinyl Princess.
Harper Trophy
Allie is a music geek.  Music is her passion.  She works full-time at Bob and Bob Records, selling vinyl. Not CDs.  Not MP3s.  Vinyl.   The trouble is, Bob and Bob’s isn’t doing too well.  It seems that most people just don’t understand the greatness of music on vinyl.  Enter Allie’s secret identity as The Vinyl Princess, blogger and Zine creator.  Can Bob and Bob’s be saved, even with a crime wave sweeping the neighbourhood?  Will Allie be stuck playing third wheel to her mother’s romantic life?    Can Allie change people’s minds about music? 

Slade, Arthur.  The Dark Deeps.
Harper Collins
In book two of The Hunchback Assignments, Modo and Octavia are sent on a mission to discover a ship that has the power to wreak havoc on the world.  When their own boat is rammed, and Modo is thrown into the sea, Octavia fears he is dead.  Modo, however, finds himself somewhere completely unexpected, beneath the sea.


HONOURABLE MENTIONS


Bow, Erin. Plain Kate.  Scholastic.
Buffie, Margaret.  Winter Shadows. Tundra.
Livingston, Lesley.  Darklight.. Harper Trophy.
McClintock, Norah.  Homicide Related.  Red Deer Press.
Muller, Rachel Dunstan.  Squeeze.  Orca Book Publishers.
Russell, Craig.  Black Bottle Man.  Great Plains.
Stratton, Allan. Borderline.  Harper Trophy.
Van Tol, Alex.  Knifepoint.  Orca Book Publishers.

NOTABLE NON FICTION  (We do not review non fiction but came across this book which we felt deserved a mention).

Dyer, Hadley, Illustrated by Marc Ngui.  Watch This Space: Designing, Defending and Sharing Public Spaces.  Kids Can Press







OLA’S CANADIAN MATERIALS COMMITTEE

We are a long standing committee with a strong voice in promoting Canadian  literature for children and young adults. Our goal is to highlight excellence in literature for children and young adults for the OLA membership and others with an interest.
The OLA’s annual Best Bets evolved from a list put out by the Canadian Material’s

Committee of the Children’s Services Guild.  This Canadian Materials Committee is now under the wing of the OPLA Children and Youth Committee.

The OLA’s Canadian Materials Committee selects books on the basis of their literary/artistic merit as well as their appeal for children and young adults. Text and illustrations are of equal importance in picture books and information books.


 The Committee thanks S & B Books, www.sbbooks.com,  for their ongoing support with providing a place to meet and copies of books to review. 

Meetings are held a minimum of four times a year at S & B Books Ltd (3086 Universal Dr., Mississauga). Members discuss and evaluate recent publications by Canadian authors and illustrators. The books evaluated are suitable for children and young adults from birth to nineteen years old. From these discussions, the Committee produces "Best Bets" lists, annual annotated lists of recommended titles. These lists are released each year at the OLA Super Conference.

OLA’s Canadian Materials Committee Members:

Carrie Dawber, Richmond Hill Public Library

Dinah Gough, Retiree from Oshawa Public Library

Patrick Gracey, Toronto Public Library

Sandy Laird, Mississauga Public Library

Sheilah O’Connor, Toronto Public Library

Cecily Reid, Richmond Hill Public Library   

Jane Salmon, Barrie Public Library

Jennifer Stephen, Vaughan Public Libraries

For further information, please contact

Jane Salmon at the Barrie Public Library

jsalmon@barrie.ca

Ontario Library Association

50 Wellington St. East, Suite 201,

Toronto, ON  M5E 1C8

Tel 416-941-9581 or 866-873-9867

FAX 416-941-9581 or 800-387-1181

www.accessola.com

info@accessola.com

                       



linkpost comment

OLA Best Bets for children 2010 -- congrats all! [Feb. 5th, 2011|03:39 pm]
Marsha Skrypuch

                                                                            

The OLA’s Canadian Materials Committee, which is under the umbrella of the OPLA Child and Youth Services Committee, picks this annual list.

Books are selected on the basis of their literary/artistic merit as well as their appeal for children. 

Text and illustrations are of equal importance in picture books and information books.


        PICTURE BOOKS

Bailey, Linda. Stanley’s Little Sister.
Illustrated by Bill Slavin. Kids Can Press
Stanley’s world is turned upside down with the arrival of “Fluffy” the cat.  Chaos and hilarity ensue with Stanley catching all the blame.  But just when Stanley is about to give up, he realizes that having a little sister isn’t so bad after all.  

Becker, Helaine. A Porcupine in a Pine Tree: a Canadian 12 Days of Christmas.  
Illustrated by Werner Zimmerman.  North Winds Press *
A porcupine, caribou, beavers, moose, squirrels, Mounties, Stanley Cups and more rollick through the familiar carol. With tongue-in-cheek humour and bright illustrations, this distinctively Canadian version is a delight.

Edwards, Wallace.   The Cat’s Pajamas.   
Kids Can Press.
Wallace Edwards makes understanding idioms fun and entertaining.   His extraordinary illustrations are visual clues to  26 idioms. Readers are challenged to decipher each one.   Edwards seems to be telling us “Use Your Noodle”! and It’s a “Piece of Cake’!”.  Check out the hidden cat on each page.   Readers of all ages will find this book ”more fun than a barrel of monkeys”!

Horrocks, Anita. Silas’ Seven Grandparents.
Illustrated by Helen Flook. Orca Book Publishers
Modern family dynamics have left Silas with more than the usual quota of doting caregivers when his parents go away on a business trip. As one after another invites him to stay, Silas is in a quandary. How can he choose to stay with only one when all seven want him? Clever Silas finds a solution that pleases everyone. Colourful, lively illustrations make this book a special treat for readers, too.

Leonetti, Mike.  The Mighty Tim Horton;
Illustrated by Greg Banning.  North Winds Press*
Hockey fans and history buffs alike will enjoy this endearing story of a boy and his encounter with a hockey legend, the mighty Tim Horton.  The thrill and excitement of the 1962 NHL playoffs is captured nicely as we join Tim Horton and the Toronto Maple Leafs on their successful quest to win the Stanley Cup.

Luxbacher, Irene.  Mattoo, Let’s Play!
Kids Can Press
Ruby LOVES to play with her pet cat, Mattoo.  But why is Mattoo being such a sour puss?  A delightful, beautifully illustrated story about considering the feelings of others and playing nicely.

Munsch, Robert.  Put Me in a Book!   
Ilustrated by Michael Martchenko.  North Winds Press*
An author sitting on a park bench tells Mrs. O’Dell’s class that he can’t complete his picture book until he finds a kid to be in it. Hailey enthusiastically volunteers and is shocked when she is suddenly folded into the book.  Once she discovers that she can’t escape, the other kids try to help with hilarious results.  Kids will buy into the absurdity of Hailey’s problem and will love the concluding twist.

Tsiang, Sarah. A Flock of Shoes.
Illustrated by Qin Leng. Annick.
Abby’s sandals are pink and brown with lime green trim. They are perfect for running and jumping and making tracks in the sand. But when summer is over Mum says they are worn out and it’s time for them to go. Abby disagrees but the sandals take matters into their own hands, flying away to the south like birds. Soon unhappy Abby learns to love her blue and white boots with purple trim. Until, one sunny spring day….  Young readers will delight in this nonsensical story about Abby and her faithful footwear.

Ward, David.  One Hockey Night.
Illustrated by Brian Deines, Scholastic.
Owen and Holly have moved to Saskatchewan from Nova Scotia and miss playing hockey on a lake.  However their father has a big surprise for them on Christmas Eve.  Gorgeous artwork and a  charming story celebrate one of Canada’s favourite pastimes.

Wishinsky, Frieda. The Queen’s Secret.
Illustrated by Loufane.   North Winds Press*
There’s a secret that both the Queen and Kay share – and it’s up to the reader to find out!  Delightfully teasing (the answer is at the end) this is also a rhyming book with bright, colourful illustrations.
.
*Note that North Winds Press is part of Scholastic Canada.

                  FICTION

Brewster, Hugh Prisoner Of Dieppe: World War II, Alistair Morrison, Occupied France, 1942 (I am Canada). Scholastic
Alistair Morrison is talked into joining the war effort by his best friend, the slightly older “Mackie”. After basic training they are sent overseas and end up being captured after the disastrous battle of Dieppe. This new series is promoted as being for ages 9-12 but the honest way in which Brewster treats the lives of the soldiers during WWII makes it suitable for older readers as well.  Exciting and well written, this is a story that will engage boys in particular.

Charles, Rie. No More Dragons.  Napoleon Publishing.
Alex keeps a diary in the form of letters to a friend.  As we read each entry something disturbing is revealed.   Thirteen year old Alex is not only lonely and insecure, he is also being abused.   Nevertheless, his letters are filled with humour and hope, especially when he talks about  trying out for the school play.   We see his world slowly crumbling until he reaches a point where he knows he must stand up to his father.  A believable and touching story.

Mack, Winnie.  After All, You’re Callie Boone. Scholastic.
12 year old Callie has been dumped by her best friend and has just belly flopped off the diving board at the pool. On top of that her Uncle has moved in with his ferrets and her grandma is cranky. Things change when a boy named Hoot moves to her neighbourhood.  A great first novel about friendship.

MacLean, Jill. The Present Tense of Prinny Murphy.
Fitzhenry & Whiteside
This shining novel reintroduces Grade 5 to 8 readers to characters from The Nine Lives of Travis Keating. Her mother’s alcoholism, bullying classmates, and struggles with reading are making Prinny’s life in her small Newfoundland town a misery until a sympathetic teacher gives her a book which helps her find the strength and resilience to grow past her troubles.

Milway, Katie Smith. The Good Garden: How One Family Went from Hunger to Having Enough.
Illustrated by Sylvie Daigneault. Kids Can Press
Impoverished soil and greedy “coyotes” have driven Maria’s Honduran family to desperation. A new teacher defies tradition and introduces practices which enable Maria’s family to rehabilitate their land and become successful, independent farmers. A thoughtful introduction to the issue of global food shortages. For Grades 4 to 8 but Daigneault’s charming illustrations will attract younger readers, too.

Nielsen, Susin.  Dear George Clooney, Please Marry My Mom.   Tundra.
According to Violet, divorce sucks.   Her mother dates losers and  always seems depressed, while her  father is never around since he has remarried and moved.  When she and her sister are invited to visit her TV-director dad in Los Angeles, Violet hatches a plan involving George Clooney to save her Mom and make her father crazy with jealousy.   A hilarious look at the ups and downs of family life.

Peterson, Lois.  The Ballad of Knuckles McGraw
Orca Book Publishers
When Kevin Mason is abandoned by his mother, he decides to escape by becoming Knuckles McGraw, a tough and brave cowboy.  But with the support of his new foster family, and the reunion with his grandparents, Kevin re-finds not only himself, but the courage to face his future with new optimism.  A touching story.

Sherrard, Valerie. Tumbleweed Skies.
Fitzhenry & Whiteside
Ellie is sent to live with her embittered and unwelcoming  grandmother for the summer. While a sympathetic uncle and a wounded magpie help her cope, it is Ellie’s maturity and inner strength which guide her growing understanding. This historical novel captures Ellie’s thoughts and emotions with compassion and insight.  The hopeful ending avoids a sentimental solution.

Skrypuch, Marsha Stolen Child
Scholastic
After World War II, twelve year old Nadia is adjusting to life in Canada after years in a Displaced Persons camp in Europe. But her memories and her dreams are confused and contradictory. Gradually she comes to realize that as a young child she was stolen from her Ukrainian parents and raised to be a good Nazi German. This aspect of the war is not covered in children’s books and this gives an added interest to an “adjusting to a new life in Canada “story.

Stevenson, Robin. Liars and Fools.  
Orca Book Publishers.
In the wake of her mother’s tragic disappearance, Fiona's rational minded science teacher father falls for a new age spirit medium.  Smelling a rat, Fiona and her overachieving friend Anna decide to expose "psychic phenomena" for their next science project.

HONOURABLE MENTIONS:
Fergus, Maureen – Ortega – Kids Can
Kerz, Anna – Gnome’s Eye – Orca
Peacock, Shane – Secret Fiend – Tundra
Sylvester, Kevin – Neil Flambé and the Marco Polo Murders – H.B. Fenn

          NON-FICTION

Becker, Helaine.  Magic Up Your Sleeve: Amazing Illusions, Tricks, and Science Facts You’ll Never Believe;
Illustrated by Claudia Dávila. Owlkids Books Inc.
Magic and science unite with wondrous results in this clever and informative book about magic tricks.  The easy to follow step by step instructions, and eye catching illustrations are sure to astound and amaze the curious minds of budding magicians!

Ellis, Deborah. We Want You to Know: Kids Talk About Bullying. Coteau Books.
Deborah Ellis’ latest book is meaningful not only to kids who have been bullied, but also to educators and parents.  The interviews are poignant and thoughtful and the kids have their own ideas, advice and solutions to share.  A section called “What Do You Think”  has great topics for further discussion.   The “Resources” section provides helpful websites and addresses.  

Kelsey, Elin.  
Not Your Typical Book About the Environment.  
Illustrated by Clayton Hanmer.  Owlkids
Catchy titles and fun illustrations offering empowering advice without preaching or sentimentalizing make this book a winner.  The book is packed with interesting information and readers are encouraged to connect with the environment proactively.  The author’s sincerity, thoughtfulness and ability to connect with kids shines through in this highly- readable book.

Kyi, Tanya Lloyd.
50 Burning Question: a Sizzling History of Fire.  Illustrated by Ross Kinnaird. Annick Press
Entertaining headings  (“Who was the first hairy potter?”) and  brightly-coloured pages with wacky illustrations introduce the reader to the subject of fire.  Well-researched (there’s a bibliography) with a wealth of interesting detail, this book is fun and informative.  Chapters include both scientific and social aspects of fire in a question and answer format.

McAllister, Ian & Read, Nicholas.  Sea Wolves- Living Wild in the Great Bear Rainforest. Orca Book Publishers.
Beautifully illustrated with almost 100 photos by McAllister, this stunning book covers the lives and habits of these creatures who are genetically different from other wolves. Details on how they differ (they fish!) and how they are similar to other wolves is contrasted with how similarly they live to the First Nations who share the same space.

McAllister, Ian & Read, Nicholas.  Salmon Bears: Giants of the Great Bear Rainforest.. Orca Book Publishers.
This is another amazing book by this author and photographer. We hope they continue with this series. Incredible photos and informative text make this a must for any collection. Both titles by this author and photographer deserve to be on the Best Bets list

Patterson, Heather. Canada From Above: A Photo Journey.
Scholastic Canada
This photographic book features breathtaking images of 30 Canadian natural and man-made landmarks, all shot from above.  Each picture covers a two page spread with interesting information about the location included.  Subject matter ranges from the Alberta Pond Hockey championships, to a beluga migration in Nunavut, to salmon farms on the East coast, to an old-growth forest in B.C.  

Read, Tracy C.  Exploring the World of Eagles
Firefly Books
Get up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating creatures.  Beautiful colour photographs coupled with interesting facts and trivia make this and the other books in the Exploring the World of… series a must see!

Webb, Jonathan. Canada's Wars: An illustrated History.   Scholastic Canada  
A thorough and up to date, richly illustrated book covering Canada's official and unofficial involvement in conflicts around the globe.  Starting with the Boer War and covering a surprising range of lesser known material, this book closes with Canada's role in Afghanistan.  Includes maps and an index.

HONOURABLE MENTIONS:
Coulter, Laurie – Kings and Carpenters: One Hundred Bible Land Jobs You Might Have Praised or Panned - Annick
Goldner, John– Hockey Talk – Fitzhenry & Whiteside
Lightfoot, Gordon – Canadian Railroad Trilogy – Groundwood (for the illustrations by Ian Wallace).
Weaver, Janice – Hudson.  Tundra



       OLA’S CANADIAN MATERIALS COMMITTEE

We are a long standing committee with a strong voice in promoting Canadian  literature for children and young adults. Our goal is to highlight excellence in literature for children and young adults for the OLA membership and others with an interest.

The OLA’s annual Best Bets evolved from a list put out by the Canadian Material’s Committee of the Children’s Services Guild.  This Canadian Materials Committee is now under the wing of the OPLA Children and Youth Committee.

The OLA’s Canadian Materials Committee selects books on the basis of their literary/artistic merit as well as their appeal for children and young adults. Text and illustrations are of equal importance in picture books and information books.


 The Committee thanks S & B Books, www.sbbooks.com,  for their ongoing support with providing a place to meet and copies of books to review.  

Meetings are held a minimum of four times a year at S & B Books (3086 Universal Dr., Mississauga). Members discuss and evaluate recent publications by Canadian authors and illustrators. The books evaluated are suitable for children and young adults from birth to nineteen years old. From these discussions, the Committee produces "Best Bets" lists, annual annotated lists of recommended titles. These lists are released each year at the OLA Super Conference.

OLA’s Canadian Materials Committee Members:

Carrie Dawber, Richmond Hill Public Library

Dinah Gough, Retiree from Oshawa Public Library

Patrick Gracey, Toronto Public Library

Sandy Laird, Mississauga Public Library

Sheilah O’Connor, Toronto Public Library

Cecily Reid, Richmond Hill Public Library    

Jane Salmon, Barrie Public Library

Jennifer Stephen, Vaughan Public Libraries

For further information, please contact

Jane Salmon at the Barrie Public Library

jsalmon@barrie.ca

Ontario Library Association

50 Wellington St. East, Suite 201,

Toronto, ON  M5E 1C8

Tel 416-941-9581 or 866-873-9867

FAX 416-941-9581 or 800-387-1181

www.accessola.com

info@accessola.com
linkpost comment

navigation
[ viewing | 10 entries back ]
[ go | earlier/later ]